Watch the Disturbing Trailer for Rashida Jones’ Porn Documentary ‘Hot Girls …

30 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Hot Girls Wanted.

A provocative new Netflix documentary has just bowed on the streaming service, offering a disturbing inside look at the amateur porn industry and the young women who populate it. “Hot Girls Wanted,” produced by Rashida Jones, takes viewers inside the world of young adult film stars after the camera stops rolling. While Rashida Jones is best known for getting laughs on the big and small screens, the actress has taken on a serious role as producer of a documentary called “Hot Girls Wanted.” The movie focuses on the lives of young women featured in so-called amateur porn films, and Jones stopped by TODAY Wednesday to share why she got involved with the project. “I think porn is now prevalent,” Jones explained. “I mean, it’s almost part of our mainstream.

In his Sundance Film Festival review, Variety’s Geoff Berkshire wrote that the film “will shock and outrage audiences in equal measure.” “The film was created to not only expose this appalling business but to serve as a warning to teens and parents that good opportunities, particularly online, are never what they seem,” Netflix said in a statement. The desire for movies featuring women who are actually having sex on camera for the first time, as opposed to those who are just pretending to be “the girl next door,” certainly drives the Craigslist recruitment of very young women.

The stunning documentary reveals the dark side of the subgenre, detailing how barely-legal women are recruited into uncomfortable and compromising situations. The directors’ exploration of a porn series called “Latina Abuse,” that Jade, one of their subjects, stars in, reveals a virulent combination of racism and misogyny. It’s a totally unregulated industry.” “This particular part of the industry, amateur porn — which is not really amateur porn, it’s just made to seem like amateurs are involved — they attract 18-year-old girls to come work with the promise of glamour and success and fame, to be big stars,” she said. “And, you know, the reality’s a little different from that.” “This is not about people who come from broken homes to fill some hole in their heart,” Jones said. “I mean, these girls have great families and boyfriends. The subject of women who star in amateur pornographic videos is fascinating, and to get into Sundance it would have to have more perspective than what we all already know.

Some of the girls found the jobs through unassuming ads on Craigslist. “You’re trying to be famous, so you do what you gotta do,” says one young woman. My Facebook feed is constantly filled with links to the daily outrages—political, social, and religious—that preoccupy my friends, so it’s not as if I need a ninety minute expose on Internet pornography to make me feel like the world around me is a darker, uglier place than the one I grew up in. They were recruited by Riley, who sends them out to shoots that begin as live webcams or “barely legal” shoots but evolve into more extreme, aggressive fetishes.

In a way, this model of porn production is a lot like Uber, the service that lets people sign up to provide driving services using their personal cars. As told from the perspective of some amateur porn stars and Riley, the women face physical and psychological abuse, health concerns and public criticism. Both the new porn model and Uber have some advantages for consumers over the existing service providers, but they also shift major costs and risks onto workers themselves. In the trailer below, the saddest comment of all comes from the fresh-faced young woman who says: “This can’t be good for you to have sex that much, with that many different people.

Finally, a few days into my funk, one of my housemates recited Psalm 86:5 as our verse before our evening meal: “For thou, Lord, art good, and ready to forgive; and plenteous in mercy unto all them that call upon thee.” Where there is life, there is still hope. Unlike legacy cab companies, Uber will tell you exactly who is coming to pick you up and gives you GPS information about how close the driver is and when he or she is expected to arrive, a dramatic improvement over calling for a cab that may never show up (or, if you’re African American, calling for or hailing a cab that then refuses to serve you).

We want numbers about all of it, every aspect of it.” So when we set out to make this film, we said, “Okay, we are going to go to the place, the sex research institute that has a lot of credibility. Knox was able to make substantial amounts of money because she capitalized on her notoriety after a fellow student outed her, not because the work is actually remunerative. “Riley [a porn recruiter profiled in the film] said she wouldn’t even have made enough to pay for one class,” Gradus said. “Because there is this concept, and I think especially when you’re 18 or 19, you’re not thinking about net profit, you’re not doing an analysis before you go in. It has a banner that says, “My love story is written by God.” When she tries to explain why she wants to fly halfway across the country to do porn, she says, “You’ve got be selfish once in your life.” Tressa, 19, and Jade, 25, carry Michelle, 19 to her bedroom after she’s fallen asleep on the couch. The film postulates that porn has been destigmatized, at least for the under-twenty crowd, who are a lot more savvy about what the world is selling them than they are about the laws of supply and demand.

This is definitely one of the things you should consider, that you are not going to come home with a ton of cash.” Both Uber and the new business model for the porn industry are possible because of new technology. That might be so, but if it is, it’s because the versions we catch glimpses of in the mainstream have been cherry-picked, like photos from a Theresienstadt ghetto. Uber drivers are fighting to be classified as employees, rather than independent contractors, to get access to the benefits and protections that would be due them if they actually worked for the company. For some, the attention is as alien and intoxicating as the wads of cash. “Guys treat you like you’re a princess!” one purrs, lamenting that the old-fashioned, soft-core solicitousness can’t be seen in the real world. “It’s a boost of confidence,” one says, “to know that you’re wanted that much.” A male porn star warns that the average shelf-life of a new model is less than a year, but everything comes so easy early on that none of the ladies can really believe she won’t beat the odds. Then we said, “Let’s go see what the boys are watching and how it’s affecting them.” We started there and then we said, “Wait a minute, this is really interesting what they’re watching.” Then we decided to film this porn world, because we got in, and the girls that are getting into porn.

So it was not really something that they had sort of been preparing to do all their lives,” she said. “When we asked them about college, they would say I don’t know, it puts you in so much debt and you don’t get a better job anyway …T he recruiter says I’m going to send you a plane ticket. If I can pause for a moment here, I would say that I would object to the use of “niche” as a euphemism for “hard core” if I hadn’t already swallowed the bigger lie that the new-to-porn sites somehow classify as “amateur.” This designation apparently means “unscripted,” not, as we might suppose, “unpaid.” That sent me back to George Orwell’s “Politics and the English Language.” In that essay, Orwell reminds us that speech and writing that attempts to defend the indefensible must “consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness.” He was talking about political writing, but our social commentary has followed suit. The first was stumbling across Donald Rumbelow’s Jack the Ripper: The Complete Casebook, which contained autopsy figures of the serial killer’s historical victims. It’s easy enough to say, “don’t watch porn,” and while that may be a legitimate response to an unblinking description of what porn actually is and does, it hardly seems sufficient.

Al Gore’s climate change argument was so numbingly effective that its subject himself admits that he has witnessed many viewers jump from skepticism directly to despair. Pornography, like climate change, has so many interrelated causes that the notion of confronting them, much less walking back some of them so as to stem the tides that threaten to engulf us, feels futile. By all means, put blocking software on your Internet browsers—and then turn off your televisions, close your magazines, and avert your eyes every time you pass a billboard as you drive to work. I imagine they can only make that extreme porn if there’s a market for it, so I’m thinking why is the audience for “abuse porn” there in the first place?

I think it’s kind of like okay, let’s question ourselves, all of us because whatever’s popular on the internet isn’t popular just because there’s supply. The documentary might be the porn equivalent of pictures of fetuses used by abortion protestors—the visceral shock to the sensibilities that momentarily cuts through the cultural rhetoric saturated in Orwellian vagaries and euphemisms. Given the pervasive existence of pornography and the earlier and earlier exposures to it, I’m skeptical that any single teaching tool or experience is an effective deterrent.

Ronna Gradus: His theory, Bryant Paul, is that the reason it’s happening on the production side is that it’s so much harder to monetize pornography now because of the internet. I’ve heard stories of kids caught smoking whose parents have made them smoke the whole pack at once to create a viscerally negative experience—a sort of amateur aversion therapy. If we have this kind of thing and add in this hardcore thing and then this other kinky thing, they can slice up the clip to various sites and make more money that way. But just as arguments against marijuana can’t be limited to its being a gateway drug, arguments against pornography can’t be built around hard care examples alone. That said, if I had a teenaged son or daughter, I would seriously consider watching and discussing the film with them (though please note the very graphic nature of the film as enumerated below).

Ronna Gradus: Riley’s a nuanced character and we tried really hard not to villainize him because really from his perspective, he is just catering to a need that already exists. Although the documentary doesn’t show the act, it does give us about ten seconds of the aftermath, where she is further humiliated by being forced to clean the mess off the floor with her mouth. We were at Indiana University at Kinsey a couple of weeks ago and Rachel, Ava Taylor XXX was her porn name, someone in the classroom asked her about Riley. You know how the process works where you work with an attorney and you kind of state your case and battle it out to say, “No, this is important and relevant.” It wasn’t that hard.

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