Watch Florence and the Machine’s Brooding, Melodramatic Short Film

28 Jul 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Florence & The Machine Releases Video For “Queen Of Peace” And “Long & Lost” [Watch].

Sure, Florence and the Machine’s new 10-minute short film is set in a charming spot somewhere in Scotland, but there’s not much else picturesque about it. If you’ve enjoyed the visual accompaniments from Florence + the Machine’s new album How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful so far, Flo and Co.’s new music video for “Queen of Peace” and “Long & Lost”—which premiered today at NPR—is quite the must-watch.

The latest installment of Welch’s “Odyssey” saga, created with director Vincent Haycock, finds the singer exploring weighty themes – loss of innocence, male brutality, familial struggle – against the wind-swept backdrop of Scottish isle Easdale. Welch plays both aspirant peace-keeper and weeping observer on the picturesque but volatile Scot isle of Easdale, and her emotional portrayal of the music’s lyrical content is aptly matched by her impassioned vocal lines.

The first part of the video, “Queen of Peace,” shows Welch wandering through a feuding group of people. (The backdrop is the stunning coast of Scotland.) The second half, “Long and Lost,” has a more mournful quality, as it finds Welch wandering along a dock at night in a single-take shot. “We filmed ‘Queen of Peace’ and ‘Long & Lost’ in Scotland, one of my favorite places I’ve ever been to or filmed. The coast of Scotland is breathtaking, beautiful and harsh, an aesthetic mix that both Florence and I have been very interested in during the making of these videos… it was cold, brutal and endlessly inspiring, which I think really helped the story of Florence’s struggle with her family, the younger innocence vs. the feuding violence of the men around her, etc. The rocker has long been supportive of Welch and her music since they met “ages ago.” As he told Q Magazine in a new interview, he had hoped Glastonbury would bump up Welch’s band to their headlining spot when Foo Fighters were forced to withdraw after Grohl’s leg injury. “The day after the gig, someone sent me a link to the performance and I cried like a f***ing baby.

Welch and company earned wide acclaim for their performance, which they dedicated, in part, to the injured Dave Grohl by performing the Foo’s “Times Like These.” 2015 may not bring everything that Back to the Future II promised it would: flying cars, self-lacing shoes, we don’t see ’em happening over the next 12 months. (Then again, don’t bet against Nike.) But this year will definitely pack plenty of punch when it comes to cultural happenings. She puts on a gorgeous, emotive performance aboard a boat, with the final shot showering her reaching into the sky as the ship putters away from the island, seemingly admitting defeat.

Mad Max will roar back out of the apocalypse while Mad Men rides off into the sunset, rock’s Antichrist Superstar and hip-hop’s Yeezus will rise again. With artists like the LP’s co-producer Vince Gill and Little Big Town’s Phillip Sweet in attendance, Monroe previewed what is likely the heartbreak album of the year. Songs like the brooding “I Buried Your Love Alive,” the soaring “If Love Was Fair” and the sharp title track detail relationships gone bad, and Monroe sang them with grace and poise. But they took on extra weight and poignancy to those who noticed that Miranda Lambert — Monroe’s friend and collaborator in Pistol Annies — was also in attendance.

Watching from a corner booth, Lambert sang along, stood and applauded, and eventually made her way onto the stage for a surprise duet on “Heart Like Mine,” a song from Lambert’s 2011 Revolution album co-written with Monroe. Lambert also appears on Monroe’s album, singing harmonies on “The Blade” and as a co-writer of the tongue-in-cheek “Good at Leavin’,” which Monroe sang last night.

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