‘Transparent’ is more than a TV show, creator says: It’s part of a ‘movement’

22 Sep 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Amazon Wins First Primetime Emmy, Leading Strong Night for Streaming Services.

Writer/director Jill Soloway, winner of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series for ‘Transparent’, poses in the press room at the 67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 20, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Alberto E.Last night, “Transparent” director Jill Soloway and star Jeffrey Tambor won awards for best episode directing and best comedic acting, respectively, and they used their acceptance speeches as opportunities to pay tribute to the transgender community. Rodriguez/Getty Images) “I think she was stunned and then angry,” Carrie says. “But I think in a few months she started to turn it around, and was happier that I was happy.” Carrie was at the Emmy’s when Soloway gave special poppa. Soloway, who created the series centered on the late-in-life transition of Maura Pfefferman, as well as writing and directing much of it, spoke during her acceptance speech about the world having a trans civil rights problem and exhorting viewers to support the Equality Act, which would give “gender identity” and “sexual orientation” legal protections from discrimination.

Amazon’s “Transparent” centers around the experiences of Maura (born Mort) Pfefferman, a parent of three and grandparent who comes out as transgender. While the producers behind the NBC singing competition series relished their win over The Amazing Race — it was Monday that Burnett hoped to win as The Voice returns for its new season in 24 hours. “Let’s hope we win tomorrow,” Burnett said when asked if he thinks The Voice will represent NBC’s lone Emmy win Sunday. And as many Emmy voters learned last night, the story is based, in part, on the experience of Soloway, whose own transgender parent she, like the kids on the show, refers to as “Moppa.” “My moppa, Carrie, she could, tomorrow, go and try to find an apartment and in 32 states, and it would be legal for the landlord to look her in the eye and say we don’t rent to trans people,” Soloway said, upon receiving her award for directing “Transparent’s” “Best New Girl” episode. “We don’t have a trans tipping point yet. As for NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, the exec producer praised now host Arnold Schwarzenegger but stopped short of confirming what the former governor’s “You’re fired” phrase will be, though he did address the question with an enthusiastic, “You’re terminated!” Allison Janney and Julia Louis-Dreyfus trotted out backstage together, where the former described how she felt about tying Ed Asner and Mary Tyler Moore as the only actor to win seven acting trophies. “It’s never not bad to win an Emmy,” said the Mom star, who’s putting her seventh Emmy in her kitchen with her first six. “It’s extraordinary.” As for Louis-Dreyfus, she expertly channeled Veep alter ego President Selina Meyer when asked to comment about Kentucky clerk Kim Davis’ refusal to grant licenses to gay marriage: “I’ll tell you something.

With Viola Davis, Regina King and Uzo Aduba all winning, the most acting victories by African American women since 1991, progress may be en route, though slowly. Much has been made of Netflix’s foray into original programming, with critically beloved series House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black, but despite Netflix’s multiple nominations over the last three years, 2015 was the first year that nontraditional outlets outside of the broadcast and cable networks took home multiple major Emmy awards — David Fincher won outstanding director for a drama series in 2013. God bless you.” This has been a groundbreaking year for depictions of trans characters onscreen, from Caitlyn Jenner’s E! docuseries “I Am Cait” to major films like Eddie Redmayne’s forthcoming “Danish Girl” and Elle Fanning’s “About Ray.” But “Transparent” is one of the most sensitive and powerful depictions of trans life onscreen right now, and it was a thrill to see the show honored — and to see Soloway and Tambor make good use of their platform.

In its first Emmys showing, Amazon has figured out how to both delight critics and Television Academy voters, even though it is resting entirely on the groundswell around one show. She singled out trans friends who are repeatedly denied jobs and noted that she hoped her Amazon comedy would help further the conversation. “If people understood … they’d work harder to change that,” she said, plugging TransEquality.org. “It’s amazing that a TV show, an Emmy and Amazon creates cultural change — and political change must follow.” Soloway also used her time with reporters to push for more diversity behind the camera. “Directing is litigating for the way I see the world. While the transgender theme is pivotal, the children — Josh (Jay Duplass), Sarah (Amy Landecker) and Ali (Gaby Hoffmann) — supply plenty of drama of their own. Tambor, who had been nominated six other times for supporting work, called playing Pfefferman a “huge responsibility” because he wanted to do it right — and because “lives are at stake.” “With our stories and our humor, we’re moving the whole question forward. … I always thought there was teaching in the laughter and in humor. Soloway, a writer and producer on “Six Feet Under” and “United States of Tara,” also directed “Afternoon Delight,” for which she received a directing award at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.

Despite those successes, Soloway, 49, recalls the days when she was at “rock bottom,” eating soup from her pantry, too broke to dry-clean her clothes and plagued by thoughts that she would be unable to write anything that mattered. I hope more people watch it and get to experience this revolution.” Speaking on behalf of the many winners of outstanding miniseries Olive Kitteridge, lead actress winner Frances McDormand was not shy about her desire to keep mining the character in more projects. “I want you all to start a social media campaign so we can all film more short stories from Olive Kitteridge,” said McDormand, noting that there’s more from Elizabeth Strout’s source material that didn’t make it into the mini.

Amy Schumer had a lot of women to thank for her Emmy victory. “My best friends are mostly female comics, and I’m lucky to be around a strong, supportive group of women. Given the show’s critical success, she said, it all feels surreal. “I had no idea what was around the corner,” Soloway said. “In terms of my family — what my purpose was. This feels so like this is my purpose.” She perched on a concrete wall directing the characters Maura and Ali and two others by walkie-talkie and watched on a monitor as they stood on the beach.

The Trainwreck star wasn’t sitting next to her fellow writers when her name was called onstage, which she attributes to being “newly famous,” but she was still thrilled to share the award with them. “We’re all such a group of dirtbags,” she said. Schumer also had some advice for how she gets through the red-carpet insanity. “I usually disassociate, which is something only available to you if you had a poor childhood,” she joked. When asked about the Kanye West-Kim Kardashian red carpet fall, she explained that she just wanted to add a dose of reality into the celebrity couple’s lives. “What I attribute that moment to is seeing these two people who are mega-moguls in their prime in the moment and wanting to do something to remind people that we’re all human and no one is more special than anyone else,” she said.

Soloway, dressed in beige jeans, a white gauze top, sneakers and baseball cap, sat on Tambor’s lap, threw her arms around his neck and kissed his cheek. Veteran actress King found out about Davis’ history-making win — becoming the first African-American actress to win in a leading role — backstage. “I want to curse right now!” she enthused. “That’s pretty awesome. Tambor, in an interview with Audible, talked about how he has had his nails done and gone out dressed as a woman to prepare for his role. “Transparent” has become something more than a television show, Soloway said. “We are part of a civil rights movement.

The team behind Veep didn’t seem too concerned that they broke Modern Family’s winning streak. “We’ve made history by this being the first time we’ve won best comedy,” Iannucci countered backstage, adding: “So in many ways, the tradition is maintained.” When asked whether he’s beginning to regret his decision to leave the series and pass his showrunning duties on to Dave Mandel, he seemed sure of his decision. “Like Italian tennis players who bow out as soon as they win the Open, this is a good course to follow,” he said. “I feel that I’ve taken the show to where I wanted to take it, and I’m pleased to pass it on. … Every show can benefit from new energy and new names and new ideas.” Tracy Morgan continued his Hollywood return backstage after presenting the Emmy for best drama onstage. Talking to the press, the emotional actor repeatedly thanked his wife and his publicist, Lewis Kay, for sticking by him during his recovery from a June 2014 car crash that left him severely injured and claimed the life of his friend and fellow passenger, comedian James “Jimmy Mack” McNair. “It was very overwhelming,” he said of his Emmy return. “I waited 15 months, and I missed this stuff. Preparing for Season 2 (premiering Dec. 4) took Soloway and the writers from a yurt in Santa Barbara, where a shaman chanted over them, to a sex dungeon in L.A.’s Koreatown and through extensive research on the Geman Weimar Republic. There are flashbacks that go beyond the cross-dressing camp of season one to the history of Maura’s family and their immigration to the United States. “The secret was the boundary,” she said. “And now that the secret is gone, how do these people know where they start and where others end?

Morgan also credited Saturday Night Live boss Lorne Michaels with setting an example of how to bring the funny back after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. “If God can get you to it, he’ll get you through it,” Morgan said. “I’m here and we’ll get through it. They were so busy reaching around for each other their whole lives — this is true of me as well.” Soloway’s choice to wear an edgy pantsuit at the Emmys rather than a dress and heels was deliberate. “It’s fun to think about the way to do the red carpet with a little bit of a gender wink,” she said.

I am still waiting for service.” — and what he thinks of replacement Trevor Noah. “I think we were just trying to get the shows done without being too circumspect so we didn’t get melancholy,” he said, before moving on to Noah. “He’s such a great guy and has such a great foundation for this. He has the best team in the business behind him.” HBO’s fantasy hit Game of Thrones finally took home a best drama Emmy, knocking out tough competition like Mad Men along the way. “Did they change the rules or something?” Benioff, who is married to Amanda Peet, joked backstage. “They said you could win with dragons this year,” the show’s other boss, Weiss, laughed before offering a more thoughtful explanation: “We knew that there would be some resistance at first [to the idea that a] show set in this genre, instead of a crime drama or a Western, could be a serious drama and worthy of the same kind of attention as those other dramas.

She was also quick to point out the impact the prison series has had on society. “Art that has any kind of social context wrapped around it has the ability to effect social change.

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