‘Suge’ Knight hires his 4th lawyer, who once defended Michael Jackson

30 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

‘Suge’ Knight hires lawyer who won acquittal of Michael Jackson.

LOS ANGELES — In an unusual set of hearings on Friday, Marion Knight, the former chief executive of Death Row Records, who is known as Suge among associates in the music world, was granted a delay in his scheduled murder trial as he enlisted a new lawyer, Thomas A. Marion “Suge” Knight’s lawyer is arguing that a murder case against the former rap music mogul should be dismissed because one of the men he is accused of running over with his pickup truck did not identify him in court. The appearance of attorney Thomas Mesereau prompted the judge to reschedule a hearing on a motion by Knight to dismiss murder, attempted murder and hit-and-run charges. Sloan refused to identify Knight while testifying at a hearing last month, but he gave detectives a lucid account after being struck and said he started a fight before the crash in the parking lot of a Compton burger stand.

Sloan even identifies Marion Knight as a driver of the red truck in question; the red truck that hit the victims.” In the prosecution’s response to Fletcher’s motion, they admit that while Sloan did not finger “Marion Knight” like Fletcher contends, the actor did say “Suge.” They also provided other evidence that reinforced Knight’s alleged involvement. Coen said that wasn’t entirely true and that he had entered a sealed order about Knight’s rights in jail at the request of sheriff’s officials that prosecutors did not know about.

He said he was too sick to come to court Wednesday, but superior court judge Ronald Coen said he would order Knight to be forcibly brought in Friday if necessary. Knight was a key player in the gangsta rap scene that flourished in the 1990s, and his label once listed Dr Dre, Tupac Shakur and Snoop Dogg among its artists. However, despite suffering multiple serious injuries after being hit by Knight’s SUV, Sloan testified that he refused to be a “snitch” and that his memory of the hit-and-run has become blurry. “I will not be used to send Suge Knight to prison,” Sloan said. Knight, 50, is being held on charges that he murdered a man and attempted to murder another in January near the shooting of a promotional video for the movie “Straight Outta Compton.” That film is about the rap group N.W.A., some of whose members Mr. He pleaded no contest in 1995 and was sentenced to five years’ probation for assaulting two rap entertainers at a Hollywood recording studio in 1992.

If convicted, Knight faces life in prison. 2015 may not bring everything that Back to the Future II promised it would: flying cars, self-lacing shoes, we don’t see ’em happening over the next 12 months. (Then again, don’t bet against Nike.) But this year will definitely pack plenty of punch when it comes to cultural happenings. Mad Max will roar back out of the apocalypse while Mad Men rides off into the sunset, rock’s Antichrist Superstar and hip-hop’s Yeezus will rise again. After months of escalating protests and grassroots organizing in response to the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, police reformers have issued many demands. The moderates in this debate typically qualify their rhetoric with “We all know we need police, but…” It’s a familiar refrain to those of us who’ve spent years in the streets and the barrios organizing around police violence, only to be confronted by officers who snarl, “But who’ll help you if you get robbed?” We can put a man on the moon, but we’re still lacking creativity down here on Earth. While law enforcers have existed in one form or another for centuries, the modern police have their roots in the relatively recent rise of modern property relations 200 years ago, and the “disorderly conduct” of the urban poor.

Like every structure we’ve known all our lives, it seems that the policing paradigm is inescapable and everlasting, and the only thing keeping us from the precipice of a dystopic Wild West scenario. Rather than be scared of our impending Road Warrior future, check out just a few of the practicable, real-world alternatives to the modern system known as policing: Unarmed but trained people, often formerly violent offenders themselves, patrolling their neighborhoods to curb violence right where it starts. Stop believing that police are heroes because they are the only ones willing to get in the way of knives or guns – so are the members of groups like Cure Violence, who were the subject of the 2012 documentary The Interrupters. There are also feminist models that specifically organize patrols of local women, who reduce everything from cat-calling and partner violence to gang murders in places like Brooklyn. While police forces have benefited from military-grade weapons and equipment, some of the most violent neighborhoods have found success through peace rather than war.

Violent offenses count for a fraction of the 11 to 14 million arrests every year, and yet there is no real conversation about what constitutes a crime and what permits society to put a person in chains and a cage. Decriminalization doesn’t work on its own: The cannabis trade that used to employ poor Blacks, Latinos, indigenous and poor whites in its distribution is now starting to be monopolized by already-rich landowners. To quote investigative journalist Christian Parenti’s remarks on criminal justice reform in his book Lockdown America, what we really need most of all is “less.” Also known as reparative or transformative justice, these models represent an alternative to courts and jails. From hippie communes to the IRA and anti-Apartheid South African guerrillas to even some U.S. cities like Philadelphia’s experiment with community courts, spaces are created where accountability is understood as a community issue and the entire community, along with the so-called perpetrator and the victim of a given offense, try to restore and even transform everyone in the process. Communities that have tools to engage with each other about problems and disputes don’t have to consider what to do after anti-social behaviors are exhibited in the first place.

Obviously these could become police themselves and then be subject to the same abuses, but as a temporary solution they have been making a real impact. In New York, Rikers Island jails as many people with mental illnesses “as all 24 psychiatric hospitals in New York State combined,” which is reportedly 40% of the people jailed at Rikers. We have created a tremendous amount of mental illness, and in the real debt and austerity dystopia we’re living in, we have refused to treat each other for our physical and mental wounds. Mental health has often been a trapdoor for other forms of institutionalized social control as bad as any prison, but shifting toward preventative, supportive and independent living care can help keep those most impacted from ending up in handcuffs or dead on the street.

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