“Steve Jobs” Among Weekend Box Office Flops | News Entertainment

“Steve Jobs” Among Weekend Box Office Flops

26 Oct 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

‘Witch Hunter’ tanks, ‘Steve Jobs’ fizzles at the box office.

The pack of new releases proved to be all out duds, some worse than others, leaving room for holdovers The Martian and Goosebumps to stay in the top spots with $15.9 million (Dh58. 3 million) and $15.5 million, respectively according to Rentrak estimates Sunday. Director of the movie Danny Boyle (L) poses with writer Aaron Sorkin at an industry screening of “Steve Jobs” at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California (REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni) .

There is not much cause for celebration at the box office this weekend. “Jem and the Holograms” became one of the worst debuts of all time for a major studio movie opening in over 2,000 locations with a truly outrageous $1.3 million.In a weekend filled with five new wide releases, it was the holdovers that came out on top, with The Martian retaking first place in its fourth weekend. Four new films, including “Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension” and Vin Diesel’s “The Last Witch Hunter,” crowded into theaters this weekend and were swiftly pulverized and left for dead. Instead, holdovers “The Martian” and “Goosebumps” came in first and second place, respectively. “The Martian” grossed an estimated $15.9 million in the U.S. and Canada, bringing the space drama’s total to $166 million. “Goosebumps” held strong in its second week, collecting $15.5 million for a cumulative $43.7 million. “Bridge of Spies” fell 26% and grossed an additional $11.4 million in third place. Steve Jobs, which had an extremely promising start after opening in limited release to the best per-theater average of the year, failed to translate that to nationwide success, placing seventh for the weekend and only earning an estimated $7.3 million in 2,493 theaters.

The quality of many of these films was so atrocious that it didn’t matter where you opened them,” said Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “They were never going to do well.” hen the dust settled it was Ridley Scott’s “The Martian” in first place, adding $15.9 million to the Fox release’s impressive $166.4 million domestic haul. VIA 0.78 % ’s Paramount Pictures’ “Paranormal Activity,” which has garnered attention thanks to an unusual distribution strategy that has kept it from playing in most major theater chains, missed expectations and scared up only $8.2 million. “Steve Jobs,” the biopic from Comcast Corp.

But The Ghost Dimension, which earned a C CinemaScore, also opened on about half the number of screens as the previous entries in the Paranormal Activity series, as this was the first film to premiere under Paramount’s flexible release plan, which allows the studio to move up the home entertainment release. Bill Murray’s Rock the Kasbah barely did better in ticket sales, pulling in only $1.5 million from 2,012 theatres, but it also cost three times as much as Jem to produce. Jem’s $1.3 million debut and Kasbah’s $1.5 million make them the third and fourth worst wide-release openings in box office history, clocking in behind 2012’s Oogieloves In The Big Balloon Adventure ($443,901) and 2008’s Delgo ($511,920). The holiday falls on a Saturday, the busiest day for moviegoing, so studios were hoping to steer clear of what is shaping up to be a dead period by pushing lots of new content into this weekend.

Several of the theaters that agreed to show the film after major exhibitors bowed out were discount houses with small capacities that consumers often don’t turn to for wide releases, added Mr. Under pressure for the movies to work under the setup, the studio is playing advertisements for “Scouts Guide” during the closing credits of “Paranormal” in some locations. “Rock the Kasbah,” an Open Road Films release starring Bill Murray as a washed-up music producer who finds a star in Afghanistan, barely filled any seats with $1.5 million in 13th place. Universal isn’t disappointed with the expansion numbers and anticipates that Steve Jobs will continue to be in the cultural conversation, especially as the awards season kicks off. AMC and Cineplex agreed to participate in the model, but others refused to play the movie. “It feels to us really clear that any issues that we had were not related to consumer behaviour,” said Megan Colligan, Paramount’s president of worldwide distribution and marketing. “There’re just too many films being released into the marketplace. Over the past month we’ve had on average at least three new wide release films entering the marketplace every week,” Dergarabedian said. “Audiences, and particularly older audiences for whom these films have great appeal, they’re staying away.

It’s easy to get lost if you’re a newcomer into such a crowded environment.” As audiences pick and choose where to spend their entertainment dollars, Dergarabedian also notes that there is a handful of probable blockbusters on the way with Spectre, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The talky drama always faced commercial headwinds — something that caused one studio, Sony, to pass on the project, before producer Scott Rudin found a backer in Universal. Ultimately the buzz didn’t translate into box office, and making it unlikely that “Steve Jobs” will earn back its $30 million budget and millions more in marketing costs. Universal said the picture is doing well in major markets like New York and San Francisco, and the studio believes that mounting Oscar buzz will help “Steve Jobs” attract audiences going forward.

In the art house world, Focus Features debuted historical drama “Suffragette” in four locations where it made $77,000 for a per-screen average of $19,250, while Broad Green fielded the Sarah Silverman drama “I Smile Back” in two locations to $16,036, for a per-screen average of $8,018.

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