‘Star Wars’ actors are using #ForceforDaniel in effort to fulfill dying fan’s wish

6 Nov 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

10 movies to see this winter.

Unless you have been living under a rock for the last few months you will know Star Wars: The Force Awakens is one of the most important movies of all time to fans of Sci-Fi – but none more than Daniel Fleetwood. A terminally ill “Star Wars” fan, who was given just a few months to live, was granted his wish to see the new “The Force Awakens” film on Thursday, nearly two months before it comes out in theaters.The hashtag #ForceForDaniel began to circulate on social media, and was supported by the film’s stars John Boyega, Mark Hamill, who plays Luke Skywalker, and Gwendoline Christie.Star Wars Storm Trooper characters stand in front of the Puerta de Alcala monument, by a giant Star Wars helmet that was unveiled during the inauguration of an open air exhibition called ‘Face the Force’ in Madrid, Spain, Friday, Oct. 30, 2015.

Fleetwood, who is suffering from an aggressive form of cancer affecting 90 percent of his lungs, announced in September that he only had one or two months left to live. Daniels wife Ashley posted a messge on her Facebook page, thanking Disney and the film’s director JJ Abrams for making her husbands dream come through. “Today the wonderful Disney and Luscasfilms made his final dream come true, in the amazing typical Disney way, they really do make dreams come through. Many, if not all, U.S. theater chains have banned moviegoers from attending the new “Star Wars” film accompanied by any “Star Wars” toy weaponry or storm trooper masks, or even from wearing face paint. Disney said on Thursday that the screening for Fleetwood had taken place and that “all involved were happy to be able to make it happen.” The company did not say where the screening took place, but given Fleetwood’s poor health, it is likely to have been at his home.

In short, bring your lightsaber, turn it off during the movie, and leave the blaster and Darth Vader mask at home.” The Cinemark chain goes a step further. Disney is pulling out all the stops ahead of the hotly-anticipated release of the next film in the blockbuster “Star Wars” series, with a massive merchandising blitz expected to reap billions of dollars. The push to drive up excitement for the film began in earnest in September — more than three months before “Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens” hits screens worldwide in mid-December.

Disney tapped into the growing toy unboxing phenomenon during its “Force Friday” event, and the hype has been mounting ever since, with ecstatic fans snapping up advance tickets and products related to the film’s beloved characters. “They have done a remarkable and effective job in getting people into such a state of anticipation,” said Tom Nunan, a film producer and lecturer at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television. “And Disney knows that many of the items they are selling will never be opened and will be kept like an artifact or jewel that someone might sell some day.” Experts predict that products tied to the film could bring in up to $5 billion in revenue for Walt Disney Company, which paid $4 billion for ‘Star Wars’ creator George Lucas’s Lucasfilm in 2012. Also, no one’s nixed dressing up as Leonardo DiCaprio’s early 19th century frontiersman in the forthcoming drama “The Revenant.” But who wants half their popcorn ending up somewhere in an unkempt fur-trapper beard? The most affirmative newspaper movie since “All the President’s Men” stars Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton, Rachel McAdams and Brian d’Arcy James as the four-person Boston Globe investigative journalism unit that exposed the scarily wide-ranging Catholic archdiocese sexual abuse scandal. “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2,” Nov. 20. The trilogy (expanded to four, because the movies have made a tremendous amount of money) concludes with Jennifer Lawrence proving, once and for all, that Donald Sutherland does not know how to run a country!

Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky Balboa eases into the Burgess Meredith gruff-but-wily mentor position in this story of Rocky training the son (Michael B. Disney/Pixar’s latest ruthless assault on our emotions tells the tale of Arlo the Apatosaurus, his kindly preteen human savior and the value of interspecies friendship in a world of predators as well as wonders. Spike Lee’s brash update on the ancient Athenian anti-war comedy “Lysistrata” takes place in modern-day, bullet-strewn Chicago, where the “gorgeous Nubian sistah” Lysistrata (Teyonah Parris of “Dear White People”) organizes a sex strike in response to an epidemic of gun violence. Russell told the Abscam story his own way, wonderfully, with “American Hustle,” and he’s reteaming with key collaborators with whom he’s scored in the past. This year he’s going back to the wilds of early 19th-century America, for a fact-based tale of frontiersman Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio), left for dead after a bear attack, and his vengeance on the trapper (Tom Hardy) who forged on without him. “The Hateful Eight,” limited release Dec. 25, wide release Jan. 8.

Quentin Tarantino’s latest, shot in old-fashioned widescreen 70 millimeter on the substance formerly known as “film,” reportedly mashes up elements of Agatha Christie, “Bonanza” and half of everything else once commonly sharing the same video store shelf. The Duke Johnson/Charlie Kaufman collaboration, based on a stage project, tells of a customer service expert (voiced by David Thewlis) and his travails on the road, specifically his time spent in a (fictional) Cincinnati hotel named after a delusional paranoiac condition.

If you appreciate Kaufman’s “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “Adaptation” or “Being John Malkovich” scripts, you know how useless a conventional narrative description can be with his searching brand of human comedy.

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