Neverland, Michael Jackson’s former home, for sale

29 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Michael Jackson’s Neverland Ranch Lists for $100 Million.

Jackson originally paid $19.5 million for the 2,700-acre Santa Barbara property, which he famously added added amusement park rides and zoo animals to. WASHINGTON — The sprawling California property that was once the location of the ‘king of pop’ Michael Jackson’s mind-boggling amusement park is going on sale for $100m, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday. Named after the fictional world in Peter Pan where children never grow up, the King of Pop resided on the estate, which contained its own amusement park and petting zoo to entertain visiting kids, for 15 years.

While the theme park rides may be gone (along with Michael’s elephants and beloved monkey Bubbles) the history – both bad and good – remains, and it can now be yours if you have a spare $100million. FILE – In this Dec. 17, 2004 file photo, pop star Michael Jackson greets several hundred children that were invited guests at his Neverland Ranch home in Santa Ynez, Calif. Jackson purchased the 2,700-acre ranch in Los Olivos, California in 1987, but ceased living at Neverland following his 2005 molestation trial and an extensive police search of the property. The singer, who got his start with the Motown family group the Jackson Five and had such hit albums as “Thriller,” bought the property for $19.5 million in the late ‘80s from golf course entrepreneur William Bone. Listed by Sotheby’s and Hilton & Hyland, most of the telltale signs if its former famous owner have been erased turning the 2700-acre property from a fun park into a grand estate.

After Jackson failed to repay a $24 million loan on the ranch amid his mounting debt in 2008, Neverland Ranch almost went to auction before real estate investment firm Colony Capital entered into a joint title on the property with Jackson. Questions immediately surfaced as to what would become of the fantastical property. “There is obviously a lot of affection for him and his talent,” said Randall Bell, a specialist in valuing stigmatized properties with Laguna Beach-based consulting firm Bell Anderson & Sanders. “But it’s hard to get by the fact that Neverland is closely associated with child molestation. Perkins promises however, if an MJ fan does buy the property there are still a few small signs that it was the Neverland Ranch – with its train and clock made from flowers that spells out ‘Neverland’ retained and restored. I think $100 million is very optimistic.” The property, outside Santa Barbara in the Santa Ynez Valley, centers on a Normandy-style mansion of 12,000 square feet with six bedrooms and staff quarters.

The agents have stressed however, this is not a chance for fans to see their idol’s home as they will require ‘extensive prequalification’ of potential buyers as ‘we’re not going to be giving tours’. The property does features 22 structures, including a six-bedroom main house complete with attached staff quarters, a four-bedroom guesthouse and an adjacent two-bedroom guesthouse. For some time there have been reports that the home was about to go on the market – it was even claimed the new musical royalty Beyonce and Jay Z wanted to buy it.

Mad Max will roar back out of the apocalypse while Mad Men rides off into the sunset, rock’s Antichrist Superstar and hip-hop’s Yeezus will rise again. They said in a statement: ‘We are saddened at the prospect of the sale of Neverland which, under the agreement negotiated during Michael’s lifetime, Colony has the right to sell. ‘[We will] continue to build upon Michael’s legacy as an artistic genius and humanitarian through his music and new projects such as the Michael Jackson ONE show in Las Vegas.’ They added at the time: ‘We hope and trust that any new owners of Neverland will respect the historical importance and special nature of this wonderful property. Michael’s memory lives on in the hearts of his fans worldwide.’ It is where Elizabeth Taylor married Larry Fortensky in a lavish 1991 ceremony; where Oprah Winfrey famously interviewed Jackson live in front of 90 million viewers in 1993; and it was also where he was accused of molesting young boys. After months of escalating protests and grassroots organizing in response to the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, police reformers have issued many demands. The dancer, who has worked with Britney Spears and on So You Think You Can Dance claimed he was abused over a seven year period and did not realise the damage the molestation had caused until he had a pair of nervous breakdowns.

The moderates in this debate typically qualify their rhetoric with “We all know we need police, but…” It’s a familiar refrain to those of us who’ve spent years in the streets and the barrios organizing around police violence, only to be confronted by officers who snarl, “But who’ll help you if you get robbed?” We can put a man on the moon, but we’re still lacking creativity down here on Earth. While law enforcers have existed in one form or another for centuries, the modern police have their roots in the relatively recent rise of modern property relations 200 years ago, and the “disorderly conduct” of the urban poor. Like every structure we’ve known all our lives, it seems that the policing paradigm is inescapable and everlasting, and the only thing keeping us from the precipice of a dystopic Wild West scenario.

Rather than be scared of our impending Road Warrior future, check out just a few of the practicable, real-world alternatives to the modern system known as policing: Unarmed but trained people, often formerly violent offenders themselves, patrolling their neighborhoods to curb violence right where it starts. Stop believing that police are heroes because they are the only ones willing to get in the way of knives or guns – so are the members of groups like Cure Violence, who were the subject of the 2012 documentary The Interrupters. There are also feminist models that specifically organize patrols of local women, who reduce everything from cat-calling and partner violence to gang murders in places like Brooklyn. While police forces have benefited from military-grade weapons and equipment, some of the most violent neighborhoods have found success through peace rather than war. Violent offenses count for a fraction of the 11 to 14 million arrests every year, and yet there is no real conversation about what constitutes a crime and what permits society to put a person in chains and a cage.

Decriminalization doesn’t work on its own: The cannabis trade that used to employ poor Blacks, Latinos, indigenous and poor whites in its distribution is now starting to be monopolized by already-rich landowners. To quote investigative journalist Christian Parenti’s remarks on criminal justice reform in his book Lockdown America, what we really need most of all is “less.” Also known as reparative or transformative justice, these models represent an alternative to courts and jails. From hippie communes to the IRA and anti-Apartheid South African guerrillas to even some U.S. cities like Philadelphia’s experiment with community courts, spaces are created where accountability is understood as a community issue and the entire community, along with the so-called perpetrator and the victim of a given offense, try to restore and even transform everyone in the process.

Communities that have tools to engage with each other about problems and disputes don’t have to consider what to do after anti-social behaviors are exhibited in the first place. Obviously these could become police themselves and then be subject to the same abuses, but as a temporary solution they have been making a real impact.

In New York, Rikers Island jails as many people with mental illnesses “as all 24 psychiatric hospitals in New York State combined,” which is reportedly 40% of the people jailed at Rikers. We have created a tremendous amount of mental illness, and in the real debt and austerity dystopia we’re living in, we have refused to treat each other for our physical and mental wounds. Mental health has often been a trapdoor for other forms of institutionalized social control as bad as any prison, but shifting toward preventative, supportive and independent living care can help keep those most impacted from ending up in handcuffs or dead on the street.

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