Lynn Anderson, ‘Rose Garden’ singer, dies at 67

1 Aug 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

‘Rose Garden’ singer Lynn Anderson dies.

Country singer Lynn Anderson, best known for her classic recording (I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden” died Thursday night of a heart attack at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She continued to record music up until her death, and her latest song “Bridges” was released in June, but it was “Rose Garden” that earned Anderson her fame. She came from a musical family: Her parents Casey and Liz Anderson were both songwriters; the latter penned the Merle Haggard hits (My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers and I’m a Lonesome Fugitive.

Born to the music business — both her parents were songwriters — she got her start as a professional singer while still in her teens, releasing her first record, “For Better or for Worse,” when she was 19. Soon Anderson was having major success, with such hits as 1967’s “If I Kiss You (Will You Go Away)” and 1969’s “That’s a No-No” and appearances on “The Lawrence Welk Show.” She had her biggest hit, the Joe South-penned “Rose Garden,” in late 1970 and early 1971. The song was No. 1 on the country charts for five weeks and topped out at No. 3 on Billboard’s pop charts. “I totally believed in Joe South, and in this song,” she told Country Stars Online. Although she was signed to an independent label, the exposure helped her nab a deal with Columbia Records in Nashville. “He was absolutely wholesome,” she said of Welk in a 1987 interview with The Associated Press. “He felt country music was coming into its own and deserved to be on national TV. A share of the credit, Anderson added, was due to then-Columbia Records head Clive Davis, whom she called “my hero.” It was Davis who championed the song as a single and helped promote it.

Her performance netted the singer a Grammy for best country vocal performance (female) and helped her win female vocalist of the year from the Country Music Association in 1971. Anderson was a regular on the popular Lawrence Welk Show, an outlet which exposed her to a nationwide audience. “It was appointment viewing,” said WSM DJ and Grand Ole Opry announcer Eddie Stubbs. “Lynn Anderson really helped expand the boundaries of country music because there wasn’t a lot of (it) on network television at that time.” Ms. It fit me well and I’ll be proud to be connected to it until I die.” She made television appearances with such stars as Lucille Ball, Bing Crosby, John Wayne and Tom Jones and she performed for presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter and Reagan. She was also in episodes of the TV show “Starsky and Hutch” and in the 1982 TV movie “Country Gold.” Anderson’s other hits included, “Rocky Top,” ”You’re My Man,” ”How Can I Unlove You,” ”What a Man, My Man Is” and “Top of the World” (also recorded by the Carpenters). A Taos judge issued a restraining order in 1995 against Anderson after her boyfriend said she had threatened him following the end of their 12-year relationship.

In 2005, Anderson was accused of shoplifting a “Harry Potter” DVD from a Taos supermarket and then punching a police officer as she was being put into a patrol car. Over the last four decades, Rose Garden has been covered numerous times by a wide variety of artists including k.d. lang, Martina McBride, Suicide Machines and Southern Culture on the Skids. Anderson was also a horse breeder and an award-winning, lifelong equestrian who became involved in therapeutic horse riding programs for disabled and troubled children.

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