Letterman farewell is Top 10 affair

21 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

7 things to know today: Letterman calls it a night, and more.

In this image released by CBS, David Letterman appears during a taping of his final “Late Show with David Letterman,” Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York. David Letterman ended his 33-year career as a late-night television host Wednesday, ushered into retirement by four presidents who declared “our long national nightmare is over” and saying there was nothing he could ever do to repay his audience. (AP) NEW YORK — David Letterman ended his 33-year career as a late-night television host Wednesday, ushered into retirement by four presidents who declared “our long national nightmare is over” and saying there was nothing he could ever do to repay his audience.

Patton Oswalt and Conan O’Brien shared their stories of growing up David Letterman fans on last night’s show, and explained how seeing him on his NBC “Late Night” show broadened their view of what comedy could be. “How awesome was it when he would do these things and you realize part of the plan was for it not to work, so that then there could be this weird silence! After 33 years in late night television, 6,028 broadcasts, nearly 20,000 total guest appearances, 16 Emmy Awards and more than 4,600 career Top Ten Lists, David Letterman is retiring. (Jeffrey R. The guests roasted Letterman in his final “Top 10” list, a long-running segment of the “Late Show.” The topic was “The top 10 things I’ve always wanted to say to Dave.” Rock said, “I’m just glad your show is being given to another white guy,” while Tina Fey said, “Thanks for finally proving men can be funny.” As Letterman delivered his final monologue, he kept to his signature ironic brand of comedy, saying lines such as “I’m going to be honest with you, it’s beginning to look like I’m not going to get ‘The Tonight Show.’” I’m the only thing on NBC right now,” Oswalt said. “That must have felt…” Oswalt said that appreciating Letterman’s sensibility was so important to him that he broke up with a girlfriend because she didn’t like him. “He comes on and it’s just uncomfortable and there’s all this quiet,” he said, explaining her dislike of Dave. “Isn’t it weird,” Oswalt also said, “how Dave dressed even more square and nerdy than Johnny Carson did and it took you a second to realize how weird he was,” Oswalt said. As the tuxedoed Foo Fighters performed “Everlong”— a song they first played on the “Late Show” when Letterman returned after heart surgery in 2000 — a long montage of photographs from three decades of television history zipped past on the screen.

Holding out HOPE: The valedictorian of an Atlanta high school is seeking donations to pay for college because he is not eligible for HOPE due to his immigration status. Letterman presided over 6,028 broadcasts on CBS and NBC, the transplanted Hoosier making Top 10 lists and ironic humor staples of television comedy and an influence to a generation of performers. True to his self-deprecating style, he said Stephen Hawking estimated that tenure delivered “about eight minutes of laughter.” The taped intro of President Barack Obama and former Presidents George Bush, Bill Clinton and George W.

Celebrities used to being fawned over either clicked with his prickly personality or didn’t, and when Cher called him a more profane version of “jerk,” it became a memorable moment. Rookie on the mound: Williams Perez pitched five strong innings and worked out of two big jams in his first major league start, and Braves beat the Rays 2-1. His audience welcomed him back after a heart bypass, listened as he became the first late-night host back on the air after the 2001 terrorist attacks and saw him acknowledge to inappropriately having sex with a subordinate. With his monologue and Top 10 list, the final show kept the same format of thousands before them, although he gave no one the pressure of being a guest on the final show. His last few weeks have been warmly nostalgic, with Letterman entertaining old friends like Tom Hanks, George Clooney, Julia Roberts and Oprah Winfrey.

Anticipating the end, viewers sent Letterman to the top of the late-night ratings the week before last for the first time since Jimmy Fallon took over at “Tonight” and they competed with original telecasts. Chairman Leslie Moonves to his researchers and crew members. “He was guarded but you could tell it was really hard for him,” said John Bernstein, who flew in from Los Angeles to attend the final taping. “You could see his emotion. But I think he’s feeling a lot more than he’s showing.” Rival Jimmy Kimmel paid tribute to Letterman by not making a fresh ABC show on Wednesday, when he usually competes in the same time slot.

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