Leftists take cheap shots at ‘American Sniper’s real-life hero

23 Jan 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

I ate 6K calories daily to prep for ‘American Sniper': Bradley Cooper.

“American Sniper’” is by far the best film I’ve seen in years. Hollywood hunk Bradley Cooper has revealed he consumed an insane 6,000 calories a day to play the role of the Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in ‘American Sniper’. “I had to get to the point where I believed I was him.As a young boy, Chris Kyle receives a lesson in life from his strict and militant Texan father who believes that the world is divided into sheep, wolves and sheepdogs, those rare, righteous souls called to protect the innocent from the wicked. But don’t tell that to Hollywood’s leftist wusses who have tried to turn the public against Chris Kyle, a sharpshooter who selflessly saved American backsides.

By then, news of Kyle’s life, his “unverifiable” legacy and his tragic death will have already ricocheted around the world, thanks to the box office hit “American Sniper.” The circumstances of Kyle’s death aren’t discussed in detail in the Oscar-nominated biopic, which mostly focuses on Kyle’s career as one of the country’s most praised and skilled snipers. Though the movie is presented as a mini-chronicle of America’s modern wars, it omits a chapter in Kyle’s real-life story that reflects on war’s dark, lingering consequences: His death at the hands of another veteran — one who had been scarred by the effects of war-related mental illness. The film paints a portrait of a gung-ho warrior haunted after he’s forced to slay a mother and child who were armed with a rocket-propelled grenade. His caloric intake was in addition to gruelling workouts with trainer Jason Walsh that consisted of exercises like Bulgarian split squats and single-leg deadlifts. “You could see him becoming Chris Kyle. After four tours in Iraq, he came home to his wife and two kids in Texas, was honorably discharged, became president of a security-training firm and wrote a best-selling memoir on which the movie was based.

He had threatened to kill his family and himself — threats that were taken so seriously that a Marine friend removed all the weapons from the house for safekeeping. “They’re all hunting weapons, you know, shotguns and rifles,” his mother, Jodi Routh, said in a 911 call to police months before the shooting. “He was threatening to, you know, shoot himself, and I just can’t have that. … We were trying to get them out of here without him seeing us take them out.” Routh’s relatives say he was formally diagnosed with PTSD. Then he was shot to death with a friend at a shooting range in 2013, allegedly by a former Marine whom he was helping to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Several Bollywood glitterati graced the special screening of Neeraj Pandey’s upcoming venture Baby starring Akshay Kumar, Anupam Kher and Kay Kay Menon in pivotal roles. That Kyle would be killed by a veteran who was like so many others he tried to help — troubled by war and struggling to adjust to civilian life — was a tragedy layered upon a tragedy.

In its first days of wide release, the film has shattered the January box-office record, taking in more than $107 million in ticket sales over the four-day holiday weekend. Kyle had answered the call from Routh’s mother to help her son, but Eddie Routh turned on him, shooting him in the back. “To try and even find an excuse is disgusting,” his widow, Taya Kyle, recently told the Los Angeles Times. “I know people with PTSD, and it’s very real and very hard. But it doesn’t change your core character.” A 2014 study found that veterans who had problems with PTSD or alcohol abuse were seven times more likely to engage in acts of “severe violence” than other veterans. Jett’s piece of hit journalism, about a movie that he could not be bothered to see, was, reportedly, a big hit among movers and shakers in the movie capital. And in 2011, a New York Times analysis of some of those cases found dozens of examples of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans accused of murder; some of the veterans even turned weapons on themselves.

Why are simplistic patriots treating him as a hero?” The mindless piece has been passed among members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, who chose Oscar nominees, according to TheWrap entertainment Web site. (“Sniper” received six Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Cooper. Clint Eastwood was snubbed for Best Director.) “He seems like he may be a sociopath,” an academy member — who had not seen the film — told the site about Kyle, who wrote in his memoir that our enemies were “savages” and that his “only regret is that I didn’t kill more.” This comes at a time when ISIS savages have publicly executed 13 teenage boys in Iraq. Jihadis of the Islamic State reportedly shot the youngsters with machine guns for violating Sharia law by watching a soccer match on TV between teams from Iraq and Jordan. But Kyle, whose job was to take out such subhumans, was obscenely slimed by actor Seth Rogen and by documentary filmmaker, and all-around imbecile, Michael Moore.

Rogen sent out a rude tweet in which he wrote that “Sniper” reminded him of the phony Nazi propaganda film in the 2009 flick “Inglourious Basterds.” Caught being a jerk, Rogen backtracked, posting, “I just said something ‘kinda reminded’ me of something else. John’s petition to move the trial from Erath County in Texas has already been denied once; it will likely be even more difficult now to find a suitable venue where anyone can claim to not know Chris Kyle’s name, or at least his “American Sniper” accomplishments. He returned to the United States and worked odd jobs, and he was reportedly prescribed eight medications to treat a wide range of symptoms, including depression, mania and nightmares, according to the New Yorker. And invaders r worse.” He later insisted he was not referring to Kyle or to “American Sniper.” But he blasted Eastwood on Facebook, writing, “Too bad Clint gets Vietnam and Iraq confused in his storytelling,’’ and that he “has his characters calling Iraqis ‘savages’ throughout the film.” “Sniper” critics are “not fit to shine Chris Kyle’s combat boots,” Sarah Palin, the former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice-presidential candidate, wrote on Facebook.

When anger on rare occasions turns to violence, it could be because the person is experiencing a flashback, which might to them seem like a potent hallucination, Foa said. But he was arrested and charged in federal court in Manhattan Thursday with fraud and conspiracy, accused of lining his pockets with $4 million in kickbacks and bribes. Their struggle with Routh’s mental state continued after he left the Marines until the day he told his sister he “traded his soul for a new truck” that afternoon in 2013. “I am so sorry for the Kyles and the Littlefields,” his father, Raymond Routh, told the Daily Mail this month. “We wrote them letters of apology after it happened but you can’t talk to them because there’s anger, there’s hurt.

Jane Fonda, 77, was confronted by about 50 Vietnam War veterans and their supporters at a Maryland speaking engagement last week, some wielding American flags and signs that read, “Forgive? Never.’’ In 1972, Fonda traveled to North Vietnam, where she posed for photographs atop an enemy anti-aircraft gun, wearing a helmet and laughing like a loon.

Golfer Tiger Woods, 39, traveled to Italy to watch his skier gal pal, Lindsey Vonn, 30, win her record 63rd World Cup victory this week — with a front tooth missing. This prompted Woods-watchers to wonder if the pearly white was knocked out by his then-wife, Elin Nordegren, who hurled a cell phone at Woods’ mouth on Thanksgiving 2009, chipping a tooth, then chased him out of their Florida mansion with a golf club after learning that her man was wildly unfaithful.

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