Jon Stewart, ‘Daily Show’ win farewell awards; ‘Olive Kitteridge’ is a big winn

21 Sep 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Big Emmy wins for Jon Stewart, ‘Transparent,’ ‘Veep’.

The Emmys paid tribute to all of the celebrated television shows that ended in the past year, from talks shows hosted by late-night legends like David Letterman and Jon Stewart to long-running, acclaimed series like Mad Men. LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jon Stewart is gone from “The Daily Show” but not forgotten by Emmy voters, who gave the late-night show the best variety talk series award Sunday over another host who’s moved on, Stephen Colbert.The HBO-limited series based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Elizabeth Strout, a contemplative examination of a sharp-edged school teacher and her relationships dominated the awards Sunday night, winning six trophies in the limited series, movie or dramatic special categories.

Anna Chlumsky arrives at the 67th Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015, at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) (Jordan Strauss/Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) “Transparent” emerged as an early winner at Sunday’s Emmy Awards, capturing a best comedy actor trophy for Jeffrey Tambor and a directing award for its creator, and giving both winners a chance to pay tribute to the show’s trangender themes. “I’d like to dedicate my performance and this award to the transgender community. … A bearded Stewart took the stage to accept the award and — in true Stewart fashion — riff, explaining that this was the first applause he’d heard in months. “To everybody on television, I just want to tell you: cling to it, as long as you can,” he said, “Like death.

Many of the final moments included tragic, ambiguous or comedic deaths of the main characters, including Jackie Peyton’s overdose from Nurse Jackie, Nucky Thompson’s violent murder from Boardwalk Empire and the brief return of Charlie Harper to Two and a Half Men that ended with pianos falling on him and the show’s creator Chuck Lorre. Like in Titanic..” Calling the regular world a “barren wasteland,” Stewart described the tongue-in-cheek existential hell of his new, crafts service-free existence. “Out in the world, there are tables with food, but you can’t take it. Jill Soloway, who based the series on the life of her own “moppa,” as she calls her parent, used her directing trophy acceptance speech to ask for equal rights for transgender individuals. “It is legal in the majority of U.S. states to refuse to rent to trans people,” she said, saying the country has a civil rights problem that must be addressed. Mad Max will roar back out of the apocalypse while Mad Men rides off into the sunset, rock’s Antichrist Superstar and hip-hop’s Yeezus will rise again.

But as Soloway said, more needs to be done, noting that in 32 states transgenders can still be rejected as potential renters: “We have a trans civil rights problem,” she said, urging the passage of a trans equality bill. ABC’s standby Jimmy Kimmel Live was also nominated, as were two shows that represent the future of late night: Jimmy Fallon’s The Tonight Show, and John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight. Green Day will finally release Heart Like a Hand Grenade, the “lost” documentary chronicling the making of their Bush-era protest album/rock opera, American Idiot, with a wide release scheduled for October 10th, DIY reports.

The night also included a fond farewell to shows that went off the air, including “Mad Men,” “Parks and Recreation” and comedic game changers “Late Show With David Letterman,” which signed off after nearly 22 years on CBS, “The Colbert Report” and, of course, “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.” We will, of course, be live blogging all this and more at latimes.com/emmys. Henson, who could become the first non-white winner in the best drama series actress category. “Game of Thrones,” this year’s top nominee overall, could make a notable showing with a best drama victory: It would become the second fantasy or sci-fi show to get the award, following “Lost” in 2005. Filmed around the same time as the release of Metallica’s Some Kind of Monster, Roecker recalled Armstrong worrying that the film would falter without the same kind of intense, intra-band drama — but the filmmaker wasn’t phased. “It shows a band on top of their game creating incredible music,” Roecker said. “It is a film that inspires. Making a last stand are star Hamm, whose portrayal of troubled ad man Don Draper has been nominated for each of the drama’s eight seasons, along with best actress nominee Elisabeth Moss and supporting actress contender Christina Hendricks.

When it comes to ratings, Fox is counting on more than the audience’s love of TV as the attraction. “Fox NFL Sunday” is broadcasting from the red carpet and the Philadelphia Eagles-Dallas Cowboys telecast precedes the awards. And finally the little film that could is being released.” Despite neither releasing new music, nor hitting the road this year, 2015 has been big for Green Day, who were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April. The band has also been working on the follow up to their 2012 trio of albums, with Armstrong telling Rolling Stone in the spring he had about five tracks finished. “I’m going to take it really slow,” he said. “I’m just going to make sure every moment is inspired and that we have something that’s really special to us.

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