Jake Gyllenhaal and Antoine Fuqua sculpt a boxing great | News Entertainment

Jake Gyllenhaal and Antoine Fuqua sculpt a boxing great

23 Jul 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

He should have air kissed! Anna Wintour recoils in horror as Jake Gyllenhaal’s beard brushes her cheek as he greets her on the red carpet at Southpaw film premiere.

It was Terry Claybon, a boxing expert who’s trained Fuqua for years. Jake Gyllenhaal takes on the role of a champion boxer who tries to turn his life around after tragedy strikes in Southpaw, a drama the Hollywood actor says is essentially about family. “That same rage destroys his whole life.

Director Antoine Fuqua, a dedicated boxer and the man behind Training Day starring Denzel Washington, was determined not to make Southpaw “just another boxing movie”.endured months of intense training to transform himself into a boxer in his latest film, Southpaw, but he didn’t need a coach for the softer side of the role – playing a father. “I have two nieces whom I adore and whom I’m connected with in so many powerful ways,” the actor told PEOPLE in this week’s issue. “They are deeply ingrained in the movie, and my love for them is there.” While the 34-year-old actor has not been able to add “father” to his resumé offscreen, it’s something he looks forward to in the years to come. “I would love for it to not be fictional,” he said. Throughout the film and his journey, he has to learn how to fight — not only in the ring but [also] in life without rage.” “Boxing is a dog-eat-dog world. Gyllenhaal is currently single, and despite past high-profile relationships with Kirsten Dunst, Reese Witherspoon and Taylor Swift, he denies rumors that he’s dating his Southpaw costar Rachel McAdams. There’s are a lot of people who are going to be your friends when you’re winning and like any business where there’s a lot of money involved, you take a long hit and everybody scatters.” Oscar-winner Forest Whitaker plays trainer Titus “Tick” Wills, who helps the boxer recover.

But the actor admits he encounters his share of intriguing people at work. “There are these extraordinarily charismatic people in the entertainment industry, it’s hugely intoxicating,” he said. “It can be distracting from your creativity.” Although the actor knew very little about boxing, “the thing that intrigued me from the get-go was the idea that Billy’s a guy who has gotten by on his rage and his own anger, made a career out of it, had great success and made lots of money”. And his trusted trainer had just told him Gyllenhaal wasn’t it. “Sons of Anarchy” creator Kurt Sutter had written the script about this champ’s fall from grace and struggle to get his daughter back for rapper Eminem. Gyllenhaal’s the first to admit he’s not a natural fighter. “When I was a kid, I definitely got into a few fights, but I wouldn’t say I was the winner of them,” reveals the actor, who played Billy Crystal’s son in 1991’s City Slickers. Not only did Fuqua think that Gyllenhaal had the physical size and expressive eyes to make this fairly unlikable guy lovable, Harvey Weinstein was also keen on him.

It would be good for the movie, because you’re playing a fighter and that’s how it goes.” Over the course of six months, Claybon travelled everywhere with Gyllenhaal, teaching him the intricacies of a boxer’s technique, both physically and mentally, in twice-daily workouts. “Antoine decided he would come with me on the physical journey,” says Gyllenhaal, recalling how the film-maker would join him in the first training session of the day. “It was amazing to have your director there with you, pushing you every day. You do one three-minute round and you’re toast.’ The 34-year-old Oscar nominee famously endured six hours of training, seven days a week, in Atlanta with Floyd Mayweather, Jr. to shape up for the part. That motivation and sacrifice is what drove both of us, and I think that energy is in the film.” Kicking off with a run, anywhere from two to 10 miles, the six-hour daily programme included rope skipping, working with mitts and punch bags, learning technique and footwork, and conditioning exercises such as sprints, pull-ups and up to 2,000 sit-ups. Antoine Fuqua’s action drama – hitting US/UK theaters on Friday – also features Forest Whitaker, Naomie Harris, Curtis ’50 Cent’ Jackson, Tyrese Gibson, and Rita Ora.

The now 34-year-old actor had just shed 30 pounds to play a creepy freelance videographer in “Nightcrawler” and he didn’t hesitate to throw himself into the ring. According to TMZ, Oona scored an impessive $100K from Disney to play Natalie in the studio’s 2016 remake of Pete’s Dragon – and a combined $600K for the two proposed sequels. ‘I’m fine. I’ve just been going through a little legal issues,’ the Grammy winner explained on CBS’ The Talk. ‘I got some trained professionals to help me with it. It’ll get past it.’ Orange Is the New Black’s Dascha Polanco – who plays new mother Dayanara Diaz – showcased her Roman numeral rib tattoo in a skimpy top and matching trousers.

Not just for the fight sequences, but I would train throughout the whole thing because that same attitude needed to be in every scene.” The actor’s journey to embody his character didn’t just stop at the physical level. Gyllenhaal felt that understanding the mindset of a boxer was equally as important in doing justice to the role. “The body will only function as far as the mind,” he notes. “I didn’t really spend much time doing anything else, or socialising in any other way. He and cinematographer Mauro Fiore even enlisted HBO Boxing veterans Todd Palladino and Rick Cypher to shoot the fights. “We shot it like we would shoot a real fight.

But if and when he does, he’s “absolutely” going to pack them off to boxing classes. “For the discipline, the commitment, the focus, the ability to express,” Gyllenhaal says. Comments that are judged to be defamatory, abusive or in bad taste are not acceptable and contributors who consistently fall below certain criteria will be permanently blacklisted. That was real,” said Fuqua. “There’re a couple shots where he really got hit in the ribs,” said Fuqua. “I would go out to stop it and he would wave me off. He wanted to keep going.” Although his physical transformation was paramount, the actor also had to immerse himself in the real world of boxing, stealing bits of personalities or experiences from the stories he’d heard from the amateurs in the gym during the five-month prep. “The effects it has on fighters are brutal,” he said. “Because of that, I’m not just there to see a fight, I’m also there to watch and ask what is each fighter fighting for — to find out what are they trying to prove.” The only professional boxer Gyllenhaal personally reached out to was Miguel Cotto, whose technique and family life served as a big influence on the character. Cotto even provided the unlikely inspiration for a small, but powerful detail in “Southpaw.” Billy Hope strides out to the ring to no music in a climactic scene, which is exactly what Cotto did when he fought Sergio Martinez in June 2014.

Gyllenhaal knew it was perfect for Billy’s moment, and Fuqua agreed. “It took me about a month and a half to come out of this whole thing and this whole experience,” said the actor, even though he’s still training and wishing he’d had even more time to perfect his boxing grace.

Here you can write a commentary on the recording "Jake Gyllenhaal and Antoine Fuqua sculpt a boxing great".

* Required fields
All the reviews are moderated.
Twitter-news
Our partners
Follow us
Contact us
Our contacts

About this site