Flashback: See Brad Paisley’s Wild Jam With Cheap Trick

23 Dec 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Here’s who should get inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame next year.

Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, Steve Miller and the surviving members of N.W.A. will be on the stage at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, on April 8, 2016, to accept the little statues that mean they’re in the Hall. • The 2016 inductees in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame are the pioneering rap group N.W.A, and ’70s rock acts Cheap Trick, Deep Purple, Chicago and Steve Miller.It used to be that the Grammys came up with the most irresponsible assessment of popular music, overlooking important artists during their best years (and sometimes apologizing with belated lifetime achievement awards).Cheap Trick guitarist Rick Nielsen admits he is pleased the news is finally out because he hated keeping it a secret, telling Rolling Stone, “Usually I’m a man of many words, but this has got me in a tizzy here.James was asked to reflect Thursday on N.W.A.’s inclusion in the 2016 Rock Hall class, announced earlier in the morning, and didn’t draw the connection between his business investment in Beats by Dre and one of N.W.A.’s founding fathers.

They are one of the most important rap acts in history, and their legacy and influence connect directly to today (up to and including the best album of 2015). The latter is not a major part of rock history, but the Rockford, Illinois band stands as an important link in the power-pop lineage – an inheritor of Big Star and Badfinger that opened the door to groups like The Bangles, Velvet Crush, Sloan, the New Pornographers and many more. I need to see a signed paper… I was prepared to not get it and say, ‘Oh, well, better luck next time’.” Steve Miller adds to the publication, “I was very pleased and happy about it… It wasn’t [something I expected]. N.W.A. formed in 1986 – two years after James’ birth – and its most influential rap album (Straight Outta Compton, now the name of a biographical, major motion picture) was released in 1988. “I didn’t know the full story about what they were going through, about how big they were at that point in time.

And Cheap Trick also gave us perfect songs like “Surrender” and “I Want You To Want Me.” N.W.A.’s musical and cultural impact is wider, of course, than Cheap Trick’s, but they had been nominated before and failed to break in. But as I got older, I started listening to hip-hop myself and started to study the music and also read about those guys,” James said. “I understood that their music was much bigger than them just writing, jotting lyrics on a piece of paper and rapping them or singing them, however you want to categorize that. “They had a bigger meaning and it was a big pop culture thing, not only for the west coast and Compton, California, but also for every inner-city hood in America.” James said the music has “been part of all my workout routines since I’ve grown up, and N.W.A. and Tupac and Biggie and Jay and all those guys, Eric B. and Rakim. After the movie “Straight Outta Compton,” there was no way to deny a group that helped plant the flag for gangsta rap, that had made an album as forceful as its debut, and that included major talents like Ice Cube and Dr.

When it came up earlier this year, I was really surprised and amazed to watch all the voting and all the stuff that’s going on…” N.W.A star Ice Cube says, “I’m extremely excited about it… It’s hard to sum up exactly what it means. The timing would have been perfect: She just put out Unbreakable, her first album in years and her best in even longer, and she’s currently on the road reminding the world that she has an incredible body of work. James Brown is already in, but turning down the J.B.’s – which included, over the years, Bootsie Collins, Fred Wesley, and Maceo Parker – feels like a diss for funk in general. Their catalogue is unimpeachable and their sphere of influence rock solid, so I wonder if the holdout is because of the utter impossibility of a proper reunion and the difficult soul that is Morrissey (though it should be noted that neither of those elements stopped Guns N’ Roses from getting in a few years back). They absolutely belong in the Hall—or conversely, perhaps they simply shift the nomination to Rodgers specifically, as the entirety of his career undoubtedly qualifies him.

But the sludge of Deep Purple, the weak mix of jazz fusion and soft rock of Chicago, and the unique mix of smarmy and forgettable that Steve Miller has concocted… Is this really the best they can do? They totally belong, and the fact that they used sidemen and outside songwriters seemed like a reasonable argument 15 years ago but now seems just silly. Only a Boomer could pick the bands behind “Fly Like An Eagle” and “Smoke on the Water” over those responsible for “There is a Light That Never Goes Out” and “Where is My Mind?” (Not to mention, taking the musician behind “Abacadabra” over a band responsible for albums like “How Will the Wolf Survive” and “Kiko.”) And let’s remember some old slights: ZZ Top is in, while bands and artists as influential and accomplished as Roxy Music, Kraftwerk, The B-52s, Sade, The Jam, T. Artists have to wait 25 years after their first record before becoming eligible for consideration for the Hall, and though Amos’ solo debut Little Earthquakes came out in ‘92, her debut Y Kant Tori Read came out in ‘88.

The new few years will show whether the rock hall can honor the most substantial artists of the “classic-rock” period and also make room for other stories as well. Sometimes dismissed as a novelty act thanks to the ubiquity of “Rock Lobster” and “Love Shack” at lame weddings, but their albums are all awesome and their influence runs deeper than you might think.

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