David Letterman Drives Into Retirement With Indy 500 Tribute

25 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

David Letterman gets a tribute at the Indy 500–but it doesn’t end well.

There have been plenty of David Letterman tributes over the past week, but one in particular stood out this weekend: a caricature of his face with the Late Show logo on a car in the Indianapolis 500. It was his mug emblazoned on the bright yellow No. 32 car driven by Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing’s Oriol Servia, with a nice “thanks, Dave” and the old “Late Show with David Letterman” logo. “Everything that’s happened, that’s the highlight of my career,” Letterman said just before the race (via the Indy Star). “It’s like Andrew Luck wearing ‘Letterman’ across his jersey.

Unfortunately, Letterman’s car wasn’t a winner, as driver Orvol Servia crashed into a wall just past the midway point. (But good news: Medics checked him out and released him.) Servia’s bright yellow car was painted with Letterman’s face and #thanksdave to pay tribute to the now-retired late night host. You know, it’s crazy.” “It really increases the rooting interest,” Letterman said. “It’s already there, but, oh my God, [winning the race] would be both delightful and silly at the same time.” “It’s Yankee Stadium, isn’t it,” he said. “It’s one of those buildings that’s been here. Letterman, an Indianapolis native whose early career included a stint as a weatherman at local TV station WTHR, says he doesn’t know if the tradition of the Indy 500 winner being acknowledged on late-night TV will continue. “I don’t know,” Letterman said Sunday in the RLL garages. “I came by it naturally, being born here. There are hundreds if not thousands of people on the tarmac near the race cars but many eyes are on one person, David Letterman, who is now retired from television and ready to become a full-time Indy racing car co-owner with Bobby Rahal.

During [World War II], it lay fallow and it was covered with weeds. “Against pretty long odds, the place has not only withstood the test of time, but flourished, actually. [The 500] is more than a sporting event. Letterman, who grew up in the Broad Ripple area of Indianapolis’ north side, said the Memorial Day weekends of his youth were filled with flowers and racing. “My father was in the flower business, so on Memorial Day we spent a lot of our time putting together arrangements that would go on graves of the men and women who had lost their lives because they had chosen to defend this country,” Letterman said. “That was the first lesson we earned about Memorial Day. Then Scott Goodyear came along. (I know him.) “How are you getting to the track?” asked the former champion Canadian race driver and now an auto racing analyst for ABC. “I’m Jeff Pappone’s chauffer,” I said. (Jeff Pappone is the Globe and Mail’s excellent motorsport correspondent.) “I’m waiting for him and then we’re heading for the speedway.” “I’ve made arrangements for you to be part of the ABC motorcade,” he said. “We have a police escort. It’s just delightful.” “Not only did they take the set and tear it up, they took all of the seats out of the theater,” Letterman said. “Two days later. I have a sticker on the windshield of my car that says MEDIA OUTSIDE and I suddenly remembered what happened the last time I was at Indy and in a car that was parked in a place it wasn’t supposed to be.

Only to find that the MEDIA OUTSIDE lot had been taken over for handicapped parking and I was going to have to park in a general parking area, on grass, that – if it rains – will become a quagmire.

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