Bill Cosby loses latest legal bid to block sexual abuse lawsuit | News Entertainment

Bill Cosby loses latest legal bid to block sexual abuse lawsuit

23 Jul 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Bill Cosby files papers against accuser.

Cosby made the filing in the US district court in Philadelphia against Andrea Constand, a former Temple University employee who has alleged the comedian tricked her into taking drugs before sexually assaulting her.

NEW YORK • Bill Cosby’s lawyers fought back on Tuesday, asserting in a legal filing that news media accounts had inaccurately portrayed him as having testified that he used powerful sedatives to drug women so he could molest them. Not making it big yet, but full of potential. “It’s a very, very good meal, probably better than anything they’ve had the time that they’re in New York,” Cosby boasts during a lengthy decade-old deposition in a lawsuit filed against him by a woman who had accused him of drugging and sexually assaulting her. All documents from the litigation were sealed until a federal judge on July 6 released limited redacted excerpts from Cosby’s 2005 deposition testimony. Getting to eat with Bill Cosby at the New York studio where “The Cosby Show” was being filmed would be like “a present” for the models, he says, a treat that would help Charney keep them as clients. Those excerpts included Cosby’s admission under oath that he had obtained Quaaludes, the brand name for a sedative widely abused as a recreational drug in the 1970s, with the intent of giving the pills to young women in order to have sex with them.

On July 8, Constand filed papers in court seeking to unseal the entire deposition and her settlement agreement with Cosby, as well as to free her from any confidentiality restrictions. The dressing-room dinners where Cosby entertained Thompson are one setting in a kind of parallel world of pursuit, seduction and clandestine sex that the comedian constructed as he was also crafting a public image as the ultimate family man and a rumpled, comic father figure. In more than 900 pages of deposition transcripts, a profile comes into focus of a man who for decades used his celebrity status to pursue women looking for mentors and eager for help in their careers.

His lawyers have consistently denied the accusations, which have left in tatters the career and public image of a once-revered entertainer best known for playing lovable father figure Dr Cliff Huxtable on hit TV series The Cosby Show. Cosby sketches the outlines of a loosely connected network of people he taps to directly or indirectly support his extramarital “rendezvous” and keep sexual-assault accusations secret. Among those were lawyers who could quash unfavorable news stories or pressure media organizations and modeling agency directors who introduced him to women.

Cosby’s deposition took place over four days in September 2005 and March 2006 at the Rittenhouse Hotel, an elegant spot on one of Philadelphia’s toniest squares. He sometimes sets up elaborate monetary reward systems, including offering to pay one of his future sexual-assault accusers — Therese Serignese — $500 for every “A” grade she got at nursing school. With Constand, he offered to pay for graduate school and campus housing, but there was a catch: “We will pick up the tab,” he said, “but she must maintain a 3.0 GPA.” She didn’t take him up on the offer, though. He presents himself as an instructor with some women, recounting how he would walk them through relaxation exercises in which they would imagine themselves “floating.” Cosby’s personal code of conduct dictates that he not kiss and tell, he says. I don’t think there was any spirit in what had happened of wanting to stay all night.” In describing his wild 1970s days, Cosby recounts how he got prescriptions for Quaaludes seven times but not for his own use.

He keeps them on hand to offer “the same as a person would say have a drink.” In his telling, Cosby is a master seducer, a knower of women’s thoughts. “I’m a pretty decent reader of people and their emotions in these romantic sexual things, whatever you want to call them,” he testified. Asked by Constand’s lawyer, Dolores Troiani, what he was thinking at that moment, he says: “I think Andrea is a liar and I know she’s a liar because I was there.” He suggests she times her tears to coincide with her testimony about “the touching.” Far from being reluctant, Cosby often speaks expansively about his sexual encounters, including his contact with Constand when he was in his mid-60s and she was in her late 20s and early 30s. While describing his attempt to seduce Constand, he balks when her attorney interrupts. “Don’t rush it,” he says before continuing to describe a scene in which he eventually pulls back Constand’s hair and bids her to press her body against his. Cosby’s wit made him one of the world’s best known entertainers, but the transcript shows that his occasional attempts at humor during the deposition fall flat from the beginning.

He denies knowing a “Jane Doe” accuser — one of 13 supporting Constand’s case — who said she tried to leave a party at Cosby’s home after he allegedly tried to fondle her. But an assistant of the comedian’s warns he will be “angry and never help her career.” He also disputes the claims of another Jane Doe, who says Cosby insisted that she take Quaaludes before she could come into the Atlantic City penthouse where he was staying. In the months leading up to the Constand lawsuit, Cosby’s attorney, Marty Singer, negotiated a deal with the National Enquirer not to print Ferrier’s allegations in return for the comedian granting the tabloid an exclusive interview. In a court filing, her lawyers said that Cosby gave her what he said was an “herbal medication,” and her “knees began to shake, her limbs felt immobile, she felt dizzy and weak, and she began to feel only barely conscious.” In the deposition, Cosby describes the night as a passionate encounter. He felt threatened, he testifies, and he had someone at the William Morris agency call to try to arrange a face-to-face meeting with Constand and her mother in Miami, with the comedian covering travel costs.

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