BB King: coroner says there is no immediate evidence of poisoning

26 May 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

B.B. King Was Poisoned, Claim Bluesman’s Children.

The Clark County coroner’s office in Nevada is investigating claims that blues legend BB King was poisoned, but coroner John Fudenberg said there was no immediate evidence to support the allegations. King will be launched after two of the blues legend’s daughters accused his two closest aides, business manager LaVerne Toney and personal assistant Myron Johnson, of poisoning King prior to his May 14th death. In court documents released to The Associated Press, King’s daughters Karen Williams and Patty King said, “I believe my father was poisoned and that he was administered foreign substances.

What’s new?” Toney said, according to Eonline. “I hope they have a factual basis that they can demonstrate for their defamatory and libellous allegations,” Brent Bryson said in a statement, according to the entertainment site. “Our coroner takes jurisdctn over #BBKing body, performs autopsy. King gave Toney power of attorney years ago, the AP writes, as well as named her executor of his estate, which could be worth tens of millions of dollars.

Both said they believed that King was “murdered” and was administered “foreign substances”, but three doctors have reportedly asserted that King was properly cared for in the days leading up to his death, when he received round-the-clock health monitoring. Nevada officials announced Monday that they would open a homicide investigation, adding that they now had jurisdiction over King’s body and conducted an autopsy Sunday, Reuters reports. King was born in poverty and grew up working in cotton fields, but went on to master the guitar and entered the music business after travelling to Memphis and working for radio stations. For decades, King played shows almost every night, becoming the premier ambassador for the blues — the music genre that emerged from African American spirituals in the Deep South.

He criticized the decision to conduct an autopsy on King’s body. “He made the decision to return home for hospice care instead of staying in a hospital,” Bryson told the Hollywood Reporter. “These unfounded allegations have caused Mr King to undergo an autopsy, which is exactly what he didn’t want.” In both October and April, Nevada police and social services investigated whether Toney should be removed as King’s guardian, Clark County family court hearing master Jon Norheim said in May, but found no reason to revoke guardianship. Born Riley B King in the Mississippi delta on a cotton plantation, BB King spent his early 20s in Memphis, Tennessee, where he moved to pursue a career playing the blues. He is largely credited with bringing blues to mainstream rock and roll, and was often called “king of the blues” and “ambassador of the blues”.

One of King’s daughters, Shirley King, also told KLAS-TV after her father’s death that Toney had cut off the family’s access to the blues great. “Just getting through this day is killing me,” Shirley King said. “Why would she not let me see my daddy before he leaves this earth?” Another daughter, Rita King, said when their father was in hospice care, “We love him, and the reason he hasn’t seen us is because we’re being kept away.” Following a Beale Street procession and memorial scheduled for Wednesday in Memphis, King’s funeral will be held May 29th and 30th in King’s hometown of Indianola, Mississippi. 2015 may not bring everything that Back to the Future II promised it would: flying cars, self-lacing shoes, we don’t see ’em happening over the next 12 months. (Then again, don’t bet against Nike.) But this year will definitely pack plenty of punch when it comes to cultural happenings. Mad Max will roar back out of the apocalypse while Mad Men rides off into the sunset, rock’s Antichrist Superstar and hip-hop’s Yeezus will rise again.

He started his career touring on what was called the “chitlin’ circuit” of small bars in the Jim Crow south (“chitlin’” or chitterling refers to the soul food dish made of the small intestines of pigs, often sold at the clubs). A week after signing off on a new round of offshore drilling off the coast of Alaska, President Obama on Wednesday delivered his most direct and dire warning yet about the threats we face from climate change. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, the president noted that the Cadets “are part of the first generation of officers to begin [their] service in a world where the effects of climate change are so clearly upon us.” The speech is important for a few reasons: It’s further evidence of the evolution of climate change from a distant threat that we need to address for the good of future generations, to an immediate threat that poses real risks to the health and security of Americans today.

After the 2008 election, Obama tried to push climate legislation with arguments about green jobs and the moral imperative of taking care of the planet for future generations. But in the second term, thanks in part to impact of Hurricane Sandy and increasing extreme weather, Obama retooled his message and began talking about how climate change will affect food prices, the spread of infectious diseases and the public health implications of burning fossil fuels.

When I began reporting my story on military and climate change late last year, it was clear to me that there are not a lot of climate skeptics in the military high command. But Pentagon officials are reluctant to talk openly about this, in part because they don’t like to engage in heated political issues, but mostly because they fear climate deniers in Congress will slash their budgets if they tell the truth too bluntly. Obama’s latest speech also underscores the fact that he sees climate as a central part of his legacy, and one that he will push hard in what remains of his presidency. After months of escalating protests and grassroots organizing in response to the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, police reformers have issued many demands.

The moderates in this debate typically qualify their rhetoric with “We all know we need police, but…” It’s a familiar refrain to those of us who’ve spent years in the streets and the barrios organizing around police violence, only to be confronted by officers who snarl, “But who’ll help you if you get robbed?” We can put a man on the moon, but we’re still lacking creativity down here on Earth. While law enforcers have existed in one form or another for centuries, the modern police have their roots in the relatively recent rise of modern property relations 200 years ago, and the “disorderly conduct” of the urban poor.

Like every structure we’ve known all our lives, it seems that the policing paradigm is inescapable and everlasting, and the only thing keeping us from the precipice of a dystopic Wild West scenario. Rather than be scared of our impending Road Warrior future, check out just a few of the practicable, real-world alternatives to the modern system known as policing: Unarmed but trained people, often formerly violent offenders themselves, patrolling their neighborhoods to curb violence right where it starts. Stop believing that police are heroes because they are the only ones willing to get in the way of knives or guns – so are the members of groups like Cure Violence, who were the subject of the 2012 documentary The Interrupters. There are also feminist models that specifically organize patrols of local women, who reduce everything from cat-calling and partner violence to gang murders in places like Brooklyn. While police forces have benefited from military-grade weapons and equipment, some of the most violent neighborhoods have found success through peace rather than war.

Violent offenses count for a fraction of the 11 to 14 million arrests every year, and yet there is no real conversation about what constitutes a crime and what permits society to put a person in chains and a cage. Decriminalization doesn’t work on its own: The cannabis trade that used to employ poor Blacks, Latinos, indigenous and poor whites in its distribution is now starting to be monopolized by already-rich landowners.

To quote investigative journalist Christian Parenti’s remarks on criminal justice reform in his book Lockdown America, what we really need most of all is “less.” Also known as reparative or transformative justice, these models represent an alternative to courts and jails. From hippie communes to the IRA and anti-Apartheid South African guerrillas to even some U.S. cities like Philadelphia’s experiment with community courts, spaces are created where accountability is understood as a community issue and the entire community, along with the so-called perpetrator and the victim of a given offense, try to restore and even transform everyone in the process. Communities that have tools to engage with each other about problems and disputes don’t have to consider what to do after anti-social behaviors are exhibited in the first place. In Mexico, where one of the world’s most corrupt police forces only has credibility as a criminal syndicate, there have been armed groups of Policia Comunitaria and Autodefensas organized by local residents for self-defense from narcotraffickers, femicide and police.

Obviously these could become police themselves and then be subject to the same abuses, but as a temporary solution they have been making a real impact. In New York, Rikers Island jails as many people with mental illnesses “as all 24 psychiatric hospitals in New York State combined,” which is reportedly 40% of the people jailed at Rikers. We have created a tremendous amount of mental illness, and in the real debt and austerity dystopia we’re living in, we have refused to treat each other for our physical and mental wounds. Mental health has often been a trapdoor for other forms of institutionalized social control as bad as any prison, but shifting toward preventative, supportive and independent living care can help keep those most impacted from ending up in handcuffs or dead on the street.

With its repetitive chorus, party-centric lyrics and pounding beat, Luke Bryan’s new single “Kick the Dust Up” fits squarely into the bro-country mold that has elevated him to superstar status.

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