Aaron Sorkin Responds to Apple CEO’s Criticisms of STEVE JOBS Biopic

26 Sep 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Aaron (‘Steve Jobs’) Sorkin takes a swipe at Apple’s Tim Cook.

Tim Cook probably should have screened this season’s two Steve Jobs movies—Alex Gibney’s little documentary and Aaron Sorkin’s big-budget work of fiction—before dismissing them out of hand on national television. “I haven’t seen them, but the Steve I knew was an amazing human being,” Cook told Stephen Colbert last week. “I think that a lot of people are trying to be opportunistic, and I hate this; it’s not a great part of our world.” “If you’ve got a factory full of children in China assembling phones for 17 cents an hour, you’ve got a lot of nerve calling someone else opportunistic.” Cook may have painted with too broad a brush, but the screenwriter’s response sounds like something one his characters would say. Film festival season is about to kick off in earnest, with Venice, Toronto and New York all taking place back-to-back over the next month, which means that we’ll soon have a clear(ish) picture of the 2016 Oscar race.

Specifically, we’ll have a sense of which would-be frontrunners are shaping up to be this year’s Birdman and Whiplash, and which look more like this year’s Unbroken and Big Eyes. Premiering at Cannes this year to rapturous praise and multiple standing ovations, Todd Haynes’s period romance is already one of the year’s most acclaimed releases. Based on Patricia Highsmith’s long-banned novel of the same name, Carol stars Cate Blanchett as a mysterious married woman who enchants Rooney Mara’s lonely young shop assistant. Danny Boyle directs Michael Fassbender in the role of Jobs, from a script written by Aaron Sorkin which – much like Sorkin’s Oscar-winning script for The Social Network – weaves together multiple timelines in its portrait of Jobs backstage at three iconic product launches.

Directed by Tom Hooper – no stranger to the Academy after The King’s Speech and Les Mis – the film also stars Alicia Vikander as Elbe’s wife, who plays a central role in her husband’s gradual self-discovery. If you felt like there was something missing at last year’s Oscars, it was probably because Jennifer Lawrence wasn’t nominated for a David O Russell movie, following her two-year hot streak with Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle. But she and O Russell are back in contention for 2016 with Joy, a biopic starring Lawrence as a struggling single mother who went on to invent the Miracle Mop.

He may have been memorably, inexcusably snubbed for Shame a few years back, but Michael Fassbender’s formidable slate this year could put him in line for a double Best Actor nomination. Justin Kurzel’s visceral adaptation of Shakespeare’s Scottish Play stars Fassbender as the conflicted, ambitious anti-hero, and Marion Cotillard as the scheming wife steering him in his fateful plot to kill the King and take his throne. Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter and Meryl Streep lead the cast of this impressive period piece, which tracks the early years of the British women’s suffragette movement. Written by Abi Morgan, who has enjoyed prior Oscar success with The Iron Lady and Shame, this is a long overdue historical portrait that’s sure to be recognized. His upcoming drama stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a rugged fur-trapper in the 1820s Rocky Mountains, who’s left for dead by his companions after a bear attack.

Steven Spielberg’s latest historical picture follows an American lawyer (Tom Hanks) who is recruited by the CIA during the Cold War, to help them negotiate the release of a pilot imprisoned in the Soviet Union. Quentin Tarantino’s long-delayed Western follows a group of bounty hunters who are caught up in a treacherous plot, after being forced to take shelter together during a blizzard. There are several intriguing possibilities for comeback performances among the cast – the central plot sees Kurt Russell’s “The Hangman” escorting Jennifer Jason Leigh’s “The Prisoner” to face justice for a murder – and the leaked script drama has only heightened anticipation for the finished product. He plays 1940s screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, whose career came to an abrupt and painful end after he – along with other scribes – was blacklisted as a communist. Previous years have borne out the idea that the Academy loves a Hollywood insider story, and the story of Trumbo’s fight against government officials and studio bosses alike could well strike a particular chord.

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